Types of Forex Orders - BabyPips.com

2.5 years and 145 backtested trades later

I have a habit of backtesting every strategy I find as long as it makes sense. I find it fun, and even if the strategy ends up being underperforming, it gives me a good excuse to gain valuable chart experience that would normally take years to gather. After I backtest something, I compare it to my current methodology, and usually conclude that mine is better either because it has a better performance or the new method requires too much time to manage (Spoiler: until now, I like this better)
During the last two days, I have worked on backtesting ParallaxFx strategy, as it seemed promising and it seemed to fit my personality (a lazy fuck who will happily halve his yearly return if it means he can spend 10% less time in front of the screens). My backtesting is preliminary, and I didn't delve very deep in the data gathering. I usually track all sort of stuff, but for this first pass, I sticked to the main indicators of performance over a restricted sample size of markets.
Before I share my results with you, I always feel the need to make a preface that I know most people will ignore.
Strategy
I am not going to go into the strategy in this thread. If you haven't read the series of threads by the guy who shared it, go here.
As suggested by my mentioned personality type, I went with the passive management options of ParallaxFx's strategy. After a valid setup forms, I place two orders of half my risk. I add or remove 1 pip from each level to account for spread.
Sample
I tested this strategy over the seven major currency pairs: AUDUSD, USDCAD, NZDUSD, GBPUSD, USDJPY, EURUSD, USDCHF. The time period started on January 1th 2018 and ended on July 1th 2020, so a 2.5 years backtest. I tested over the D1 timeframe, and I plan on testing other timeframes.
My "protocol" for backtesting is that, if I like what I see during this phase, I will move to the second phase where I'll backtest over 5 years and 28 currency pairs.
Units of measure
I used R multiples to track my performance. If you don't know what they are, I'm too sleepy to explain right now. This article explains what they are. The gist is that the results you'll see do not take into consideration compounding and they normalize volatility (something pips don't do, and why pips are in my opinion a terrible unit of measure for performance) as well as percentage risk (you can attach variable risk profiles on your R values to optimize position sizing in order to maximize returns and minimize drawdowns, but I won't get into that).
Results
I am not going to link the spreadsheet directly, because it is in my GDrive folder and that would allow you to see my personal information. I will attach screenshots of both the results and the list of trades. In the latter, I have included the day of entry for each trade, so if you're up to the task, you can cross-reference all the trades I have placed to make sure I am not making things up.
Overall results: R Curve and Segmented performance.
List of trades: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. Something to note: I treated every half position as an individual trade for the sake of simplicity. It should not mess with the results, but it simply means you will see huge streaks of wins and losses. This does not matter because I'm half risk in each of them, so a winstreak of 6 trades is just a winstreak of 3 trades.
For reference:
Thoughts
Nice. I'll keep testing. As of now it is vastly better than my current strategy.
submitted by Vanguer to Forex [link] [comments]

Part IV - My 10 Minutes/Day Trading Strategy

Part IV - My 10 Minutes/Day Trading Strategy
Part IV - Entry Options
Hey everyone, you can find Part III of this series here: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/h97sv7/part_iii_my_10_minutesday_trading_strategy/?utm_source=share&utm_medium=ios_app&utm_name=iossmf
Welcome to Part IV where I will be discussing various entry options. I’ve said this before, but it is worth repeating here as well: identifying a technical setup is one thing. Making money off of that setup is a whole other thing. This is precisely why most signal services fail. While the quality of the signal provider is one thing to consider, the other thing to take into account is that it is very difficult to blindly trade like somebody else - even if they give you their exact entry and exit points.
This is why I really want to focus on figuring out how to make MY strategy work for YOU. I will share with you a few different options for entries based on the strategy’s prototypical setup. But it is 100% on you to figure out what suits your trading style, personality, and lifestyle the best.
Part V will cover exit options.
Part VI will cover risk allocation & management
Let’s get on with it.
Basic Notes On Entries:
We are assuming that all entries are referring to a setup that forms at 5pm EST. I am using 5pm EST because that is when the most trading opportunities have the potential of occurring based on this strategy. It is also when you will see the spreads widen out as the NY Session comes to a close. Therefore, you will not want to take a market order right at 5pm EST. Usually the spreads start narrowing again by 6pm EST.

  1. Market order
  2. Limit order (we will use fibonacci retracements to figure out where to place our limit entry orders)
  3. Stop order (we can set a stop order beyond the setup candle’s high/low. I personally do not recommend this particular method, but I am including it here because one trader that uses this strategy has had success with it and prefers it)
The big difference between the stop order and the other entry types is pretty simple. If you are using a stop order to get into the trade, you will not have as good a risk to reward ratio as a trader that used a limit order to get into the trade. The advantage to using a stop order is that there will be some trades where you do not enter the trade because price never went beyond the high/low point of the setup candle. This means you avoid taking a loss on those trades whereas a trader who used a limit or market order to get into the trade would take a loss. The other advantage is that there may be trade setups where the limit orders don’t get filled but the stop order will. I have NOT statistically tested stop orders vs the other order types. If you want to know what works best for you, it is on you to do the testing.
Okay let’s take a deeper look now into the different ways we can enter:

  1. Limit order: We will draw our fibonacci retracement levels over the setup candle (I have updated the Fibonacci levels I use in Part III. Replaced the old screenshot with the new one with up-to-date levels). We will then look to place our limit orders just below (IF a short trade setup) / above (IF a long trade setup) the 23.6% and 38.2% Retracement levels. When I say just below or above, I am referring to the spread amount at minimum. However more above/below you want to go is up to you and your testing. Sometimes your limit orders get filled rather quickly. Sometimes they take longer (hours longer). I cancel unfilled Retracement orders if price has run to a fiboancci extension level without filling me on the trade. The obvious benefit to limit orders is that you can set your orders and then simply walk away from the screens. IF the setup candle closes past its 23.6% Retracement level then you will only take ONE limit order off the 38.2%.

  1. Market order: Since we will not be taking a market order trade right at 5pm EST, this leaves us with options. Because a market order does not guarantee us a fill price, we do have some flexibility vs taking strict limit orders. The risk you run with using limit orders is that if your price is not met, you do not get filled. So for example, let’s say it is 6pm EST and the spreads begin to narrow once more and price just so happens to trade right around the 23.6% Fibonacci Retracement area. This is a great opportunity to simply take a market order and get into the trade. Let’s say, however, that price never retraced back into the setup candle and it looks like the trade may simply run to its profit target. What do you do? Well, you can still take a market order to get into the trade… OR you can wait to see if price will retrace back into the candle later on… OR you can write the trade off because price has already run to a fibonacci extension level. The bottom line is that if you have flexibility and you have options. **NOTE: On setups that occur outside the 5pm hour, you can obviously take market orders as soon as the setup bar closes without worrying about unusual spreads)**

  1. Stop order: Stop orders are similar to limit orders in that you can set the orders and then walk away from the screens. If you are using stop orders you will not split your order into several parts. You will simply take one order. You will set the stop order just beyond the high/low of the setup candle.
My preferred method of entry:
I like to combine the market and limit entry options myself. Again - assuming a 5pm EST setup here is what I do:

  • Set limit orders at 38.2 and 61.8% Retracement levels and walk away. If I get a notification that my 23.6% order got triggered, I don’t have to come back to my screens. If I don’t get a notification that my 23.6% order got triggered by 6pm EST, I’ll come back to the trade setup and execute a market order and then delete the 23.6% order. I leave the 38.2% limit order as is. Hopefully it triggers, but if it doesn’t then at least I have half my position on. IF it is a situation where the setup candle closes past its 23.6% Retracement then I will only take 1 order, whether it is the market or the limit.
Final Thoughts:
I hope this gives you some insight into how we look at taking entries on the setup. There is a lot of room for additional mix and matching. You could combine limit orders with a stop order for example. I encourage you to play around and experiment with different entry conditions and see what feels best for you.
Some Examples:
*NOTE ON THE EXAMPLES* I have done my best to pick very recent examples so you can go back to this months’ charts to find a lot of these setups

https://preview.redd.it/sqj1haj3g4651.png?width=2820&format=png&auto=webp&s=39b1c99981856e85ab7c662926134994306c1938
https://preview.redd.it/5h1jacj3g4651.png?width=2820&format=png&auto=webp&s=2a7ddda53eca7b1f299d39ff67ff67f1739d8150
https://preview.redd.it/1h688uj3g4651.png?width=2820&format=png&auto=webp&s=d5f96ea18ec208329a18bca6f1b2da04d4eef8b5
https://preview.redd.it/vlhywuj3g4651.png?width=2820&format=png&auto=webp&s=58ae4911a1899f85e2e05f603f0f5856c4cc2c3f
https://preview.redd.it/h2wd4uj3g4651.png?width=2820&format=png&auto=webp&s=f332fe0cd5445d4170f4e6ac0d23351bbf08dae3
submitted by ParallaxFX to Forex [link] [comments]

CHFJPY 12h Long - Update

This was a trade I shared two days ago here. I know there are at least a couple of people in this community who are forward testing the same strategy I am using, so I thought sharing some setups and updates would help these people. I will obviously share both wins and losses, as the point of these threads isn't to brag, but to show what I'm looking at.
Here is the updated chart. As you can see, my 23.6% retracement order was filled, but price didn't go low enough to trigger my 38.2% retracement order. Once the market broke through the -38.2% extension level, I deleted the unfilled pending order and let the open position to run.
My target was the -61.8% extension level, or 115.496. If you have been following the threads about my backtesting, I went with the unextended target on this one because I feared the swing high could have provided resistance. Price made its way to my target and hit it a few minutes ago. Momentum seems to be building up, so I wouldn't be surprised if price will move to the extended target, but it happens.
The overall profit in terms of units of risk was 1.56. Your return in terms of percentage will depend on your risk management plan. In my personal account, I am comfortable with higher level of risk, so I would have risked a full 2% on this position. Since I only got partially filled, the trade would have net me 1.56% return.
Do let me know if these threads are useful or if they make me sound bigheaded
submitted by Vanguer to Forex [link] [comments]

(Cont.) Strategy Analysis and Prep GJ - 11.11

(Cont.) Strategy Analysis and Prep GJ - 11.11
11.10.2019 analysis: https://www.reddit.com/Forex/comments/duoc68/uthefrozen_one_strategy_analysis_and_prep_gj/

DAILY SUPPLY AND DEMAND ANALYSIS

Monday - Definitely a day ruled by the bulls. Referencing my last post, there was not a whole lot that my trade entries (chosen before market) allowed me to do. A bit past the upper side of my chosen entry zone you will see a double top, and on the M5, it makes a pretty clean M pattern. However, because it was so extended, I simply didn't want to jump in and "Guess the Top". Those with better analysis than I may have seen the turning point as the perfect short, as it lined up with a high made on Nov 7 at about 10:45 just perfectly. Personally, I think it is difficult to decipher demand from noise on the M15, but today was a learning experience, as I was surprised to see so many levels blown out of the water by London's early moves. Lessons learned.
Anyhow, not much changed here in the larger time frames. Daily chart and H4 are creating a very nice volatility tunnel. A true tease, the guppy is not giving us much here. What really bothers me? On the daily chart, it looks as though the nearest upward spike peaked on Oct. 21. Look left and what do you see? Not a whole lot. Nothing in the way of major supply to stop the impulse we saw. Much like banks build their order book in the JPY session (depending on who you study), this appears to be the same thing only on a grander scale. Is the lack of supply/selling pressure enough to see this to 147.xxx in the coming month, or would the banks rather average down to better supply/price before making that same move...

POSITIONING OF POTENTIAL ENTRIES:

This pair is in a lot of noise, and as such, like yesterday, I am truly thrown off about whether to choose a long or short bias. Rather, I will simply determine two points at which I feel I have both allowed myself to allow the market to make its move as well as allowed for the over extension necessary for good R:R.
To the short side, I like an entry of around 140.58. The red "1", "2", and "3" represent any unfilled orders in the near term. the 3rd level is the most opportune in my humble opinion. Beyond that, there is significant room to run, so I will be looking for good signs of reversal before making my entry.
To the long side, I am more cloudy. At the very least, the US/AUD low provides some simply stop hunt opportunities, but this is not as far out as I'd prefer. the M15 Proximal demand zone shows a fairly text book rally-base-rally. However, being on the M15, I am not putting much behind it other than a zone to watch should the long stop hunt move get blown by. The 3rd level of demand listed with the Blue "3", provides a location with unfilled stops that stand the most to lose given the last trading day.

https://preview.redd.it/2bwwnzutj6y31.png?width=1915&format=png&auto=webp&s=dd16179dd0516b773abc6b099f572e03d8b4c2c8
All that said, I will wait and see which direction the market surges in London open (if at all), and then prep myself for the fade. Having looked through u/thefrozen_one trades, I am going to be looking for the following to assist my entry:
  • Sharp rejection at my chosen entries - I am still learning how to place these, so I will also be looking left for structure to provide confluence to my analysis in the moment.
  • M/W patterns on the M15 or M5
  • Tweezers/long wicks - again, looking for confluence here and not blindly trading wicks.
I appreciate those who entertain my rambling. At this stage, I am not anywhere near predicting the next move. However, this has been my first opportunity to consistently keep myself honest in analyzing and tracking a forex pair, free of indicator madness. I am excited to see my rather dry and ambiguous observances mature into confident bias with which I attack daily trades.
Green pips to all!
submitted by Rich_Foamy_Flan to Forex [link] [comments]

A Day in the Life of a Stock Trader - Blog | Horizon Institute

Section 1 – What does a stock trader actually do
The life of a trader is often glamorised by films such as The Wolf of Wallstreet and Margin Call – a view that is shared by many who have no direct experience with the wider investment industry. It is also true that different types of traders have very different workloads. Trading emerging markets is not the same as trading FTSE stocks or the forex markets.
Let’s start by defining what traders, broadly speaking actually are:
“Professionals in finance who buy and/or sell assets on the financial markets.”
A day in the life of a trader: Behind the scenes
These are people who usually have a background in finance, either through traditional education (think degrees in finance, accounting, economics, investment management etc) or through practical experience at companies working within financial services.
This is to say that the day-to-day activities of a trader is to either buy assets (such as stocks, futures, commodities) or to sell assets (such as stocks, forex, bonds). Two distinct roles in trading can be summed up in the Buy side, and the Sell side in terms of execution.
A broader categorisation would include participants within the financial markets who trade securities. This encompasses independent traders working from home to large multinational financial institutions which see billions of dollars a day flow from and to their order books.
The Buy Side
The Buy side is concerned with purchasing assets, and this generally involves taking orders from management or clients and then sending those orders to the broker to be executed. This role is being gradually replaced by technology, specifically automation and AI, and its hard to see a future for buy side traders 20 years from now. There is also a distinctly bad reputation associated with buy side traders, these are often just messengers, and have been known to treat brokers with incredible hostility and bitterness over recent years.
The Sell Side
Alternatively, the Sell side is just the opposite – these traders are only concerned with selling positions either the firm or the firms clients holds. Again technology is eliminating this role over time, and today both buy and sell side traders simply take message, and pass it along either electronically through an online platform or via telephone for the perhaps more traditional establishments.
Private Hedge fund managers
Many successful traders have gone on to start hedge funds with private companies and from private investors. This is a highly privileged position to be in, as hedge fund managers are in control of both the broad strategy for the investments and receives the greatest compensation should the strategy be profitable.
Private Portfolio Managers
Portfolio managers working at a private company (such as a large hedge fund) is again a much sought after position. Portfolio managers generally create a positive or negative selection portfolio, which allows them to implement their own strategy to make the best returns with the lease risk – although these parameters are often set outside the control of the individual portfolio manager. The same also exists within commercial banking, but it is usually more focused on creating a very balanced portfolio that exists to hedge risk as opposed to making real returns.
Analysts
Analysts do the number crunching and quantitative prep work for the portfolio or hedge fund managers. This role involves applied finance and taking a close look at various assets fundamentals. This includes the balance sheet, income statement and cashflow statement for analysts looking at stocks. This is usually a relatively junior role, and those who are successful here tend to become traders, portfolio managers and eventually hedge fund managers over the course of a successful career.
Investment Banking
There are still plenty of traders left at investment banks, despite the decline over the last few decades. As much as 90% of the time is spent dealing with clients such as Hedge and Pension Funds.
Investment Bank Traders
As much as 90% of the time is spent dealing with clients such as Hedge and Pension Funds.
The trader is then Making Markets in Assets the clients want to buy/sell, such as stocks, currencies, commodities and bonds.
The other 10% of time is Proprietary trading, utilising the banks large balance sheet to create a positive selection portfolio.
Market Makers (Agency)
Market making is the primary task of an investment trader (~80% of market making business)
Split into two sections:
Agency Business – Client holds risk
Risk business – Investment Bank holds risk
Investment Bank charges commission on these activities at a typical rate of 5 basis points or 0.05%
Example – Buy £10,000,000 of BP stock at £100 per share = 100,000 BP shares.
Commission for bank - £10,000,000 X 0.005 = £5,000
Risk free for bank – algorithm executes trades based on client orders
In terms of basis points, 100 = 1%
Proprietary Trading
This type of trading can happen in two ways, the first where small investors at home use their own capital to trade for a direct gain or commercially where a firm uses its own capital to make trades to be the prime beneficially of the rewards should the trade go well. This is in contrast to how hedge funds would normally just earn a commission, by also utilising internal capital the firm is able to take larger risks, which tend to come with the larger rewards.
Here’s another interesting fact:
“Only 6% of candidates end up making it as a professional trader” (Business Insider, 2011)
This statement alone shows just how competitive the industry is, and to make a successful career is even harder, with only ~5% of traders ever making it to a managerial level.
A day in the life of a trader: Behind the scenes
Section 2 – How does 8 hours day break down?
6:00 AM
Traders usually start the day at 6.30 AM and start to catch up on news that broke overnight that may A) affect current positions or B) provide opportunities for new positions. These changes are digested, and areas of special interest are noted for further analysis later.
7:00 AM
Arrive at trading floor at 7:30, 30 minutes before markets open. This is the time where traders prepare themselves for the day. It also serves as an opportunity to talk to colleagues. For most hedge funds and other long-term traders, team meetings will happen in the morning to ensure all traders are up to speed and playing from the same game plan.
8:00 AM
Markets open: based on overnight news there may be buying / selling activity to adjust the traders portfolio based on the latest information. Many traders prefer not to trade at the market open due to higher volatility as traders from around the world react to overnight news.
9:00 AM
A common task around 9:00 AM would be to scan the market for short term opportunities, or to catch up on fundamental company analysis of companies in the watch list.
10:00 AM
Continuation of analysis or opportunity seeking based on the traders own intuition, experience and judgement. This is also prime time for internal meetings with the team and meetings with clients, potential clients etc.
11:00 AM
Here we see lower volume and volatility, and so short-term opportunities diminish, traders are thinking about lunch at this point. Finishing up financial models and analysis done in the morning. Another prime time for meetings with the team and clients.
12:00 PM
Most long-term traders take lunch, some short-term traders will stay at the desk as timing can be critical to a successful day.
1:00 PM
As investment banks and other major institutions return from lunch volatility in the markets increases and short-term traders get back to work. Long-term traders generally get back to analysis, risk management or strategy functions with only a cursory interest in the current market prices and volatility.
2:00 PM
Day traders will spend this time monitoring positions and executing trades as necessary. Long-term traders use this period in a variety of ways, as mentioned above.
3:00 PM
Short-term traders now think about closing existing positions and stop looking for new opportunities. This is also where the administrative functions of cancelling unfilled orders, or for long term traders, finalising analysis of the day and presenting it to stakeholders. This is the last chance to exit positions for the trading day.
4:00 PM
The markets are now closed. Traders often look back at the day, seeing what went well (and what didn’t). Management will often check in and with-it bureaucracy and paperwork.
5:00 PM
Time to leave the office and go home. The advent of mobile internet means most traders are now reading the latest financial news, following commentary and thinking about the strategy for tomorrow.
6:00 PM
If all went well arrive home, if not then its likely the trader will still be at the office working to meet the deadline of the day, from financial models to briefing management and clients.
7:00 PM
Outside of the general workday, traders will spend much of the evening doing research and analysis – everything from learning about the markets to experimenting with financial models to taking an advanced excel course.
Section 3 – Why you might want to be a stock trader
We meet a lot of traders, its what we do – and here are a few of the top reasons traders we spoke to continue to do what they do.
Love the Game
Many traders are extremely fond of the game that is the financial markets. Day traders talk about the rush as fast-paced action that runs from 8am to 4pm 5 days a week. The same holds true for long-term traders, and while lacking the constant adrenaline of day trading the highs of closing a trade that’s been on-going for months is just as great a feeling – the analogy one trader used was whereas day traders get Christmas every day, long-term traders get all of their Christmases at once, 4-5 times a year.
Financial Freedom
This is not just about the ability to make a living from trading and the financial markets, but from having the knowledge and understanding of the world of finance to make sound financial decisions, whether that be in deciding between a fixed or variable mortgage, or the best ways to allocate capital to save for school fees.
Intellectual Challenge
There is undoubtedly both an intellectual and an emotional challenge in trading successfully. While it is said that day traders trade emotion, long term portfolio managers trade on intellect and sound financial decision making.
Style & Expression
Traders all trade differently, from value investors to crypto speculators each trader develops a style and method of trading that fits their way of life and the perception they have of the world around them. If you are emotional in-tune with the wider world, then day trading can be exceptionally profitable. The same holds true for value investors like Warren Buffet, a trader who enjoys digesting and analysing reams of company reports to find what Buffet calls “Great companies at fair prices”.
This post has hopefully given you an understanding of the typical day in the life of a trader. If you feel your ready to take the next step towards a career in trading and finance, Horizon provides a comprehensive introductory course on Investing for Beginners.
https://blog.hioim.com/post/a-day-in-the-life-of-a-stock-trade
submitted by hioim to StockMarket [link] [comments]

#For Review: 'Intrinsically Tradable Tokens' (ITT's) are their own exchange

For Review: 'Intrinsically Tradable Tokens' (ITT's) are their own exchange

Introducing Intrinsically Tradable Tokens, ERC20 compliant tokens in which you can buy and sell directly from the contract.
Ropsten 0xa9e001bebe4b281f7229b0305f553ab3c511fef5
Live 0xa15c784319fa96d3E36cFE97fbadD89Ec704A8dc

ITT's extend the ERC20 API with:

buy(uint price, uint amount, bool make) sell(uint price, uint amount, bool make) cancel(uint price) withdraw(uint ether) 
and other ancillary exchange state getters (see Github repo for full API) such as :
etherBalanceOf(address holder) getBook() getOrdersOf(address trader) spread(bool side) 
The intrinsic exchange functionality works on a FIFO matching maketaker algorithm. A new order may be iteratively filled by multiple make orders on the book or if unfilled, can be put on the book itself as a make order.
ITT demo contracts have been deployed on the Ropsten test chain on which a number of Buy and Sell orders have already been placed for you to play with. The demo ITT and future, more functional ITT's can be can be interacted with using the front end DAPP ITTDesk.

Use Cases

This demo ITT serves to demonstrate the exchange functionality of a basic ITT contract and does not have much intrinsic value in the token itself beyond being a purely speculative coin.
The ITT API and base contract are open source and offered to the community in order to extend or attach value adding functionality to the token side.
As is, crowd funding and token sales become as trivial by simply placing ask orders (see Self Funding below).
Better still would be to extended ITT functionality to make a 'Payable ITT' which becomes a simple but highly versatile pay to an unknown many mechanism which can distribute payments according to proportional holdings. Such holdings might represent shareholders, a rewards system or perhaps be used to fund and manage a DAO's project funds. (I do have a Payable ITT but will not likely release it until the community has confidence in the basic ITT contract)
Other value adding developments might be to couple ITT's to fiat currencies for truly low friction decentralised forex.

Current State of Development

As deployed, the ITT Demo contract is yet to undergo extensive testing and formal verification. It appears to work as intended (unless compiled with 0.4.5+commit.b318366e! My first launch attempt drove me crazy until that bug was announced). The contract on both chains have been verified on etherscan.io etherscan.io.
The ITTDesk app is very much in alpha release, minimalist and clunky in it's function. It is written on Meteor and attempts to use Mist styling and elements. Probably best just to clone the repo and run it up in Meteor at this stage. It features intelligent ask/bid/buy/sell trade buttons to assisting in validating user inputs in the order fields.
I am not an experienced web developer, so feed back, suggestions, criticisms are most welcome. In particular, I've not been able to work up the filters without causing browser timeout.

How does it work?

The order book utilises a mapping of 'Circular Linked Lists (CLL)' from the LibCLLi library to order and lookup the booked prices and iterate the FIFO's at each price. Each FIFO in the mapping is keyed by its price and holds all the addresses of traders who have made orders at that price. A trader can only have a single order at any particular price. An attempt to book another order at the same price will adjust and put the order at the back of the FIFO queue. This prevents FIFO hogging in which a trader might otherwise starve other orders by continually topping up their own.
A second trivial mapping holds the actual order amounts. It is keyed by a SHA3 hash of the trader's address with the price of the order (and is actually what limits the trader to one price, one order).
The CLL's heads are static at mapping key '0'. To use as a FIFO, nodes are simply inserted previous to the head and removed from next to the head. A FILO (stack) can be implemented with equal simplicity.
In the case of the price list, the links either side of the head are the highestBid (previous) and lowestAsk (next) making the head node itself the market spread. The price list is artificially bound to minimum (uint 1) and maximum (uint 2**128) prices. New price nodes are inserted relative to the head (spread) after iterating through an order search.
Looping operations in Smart Contracts can be bug prone and costly, especially with state mutations in each loop as in the ITT's matching algorithm. For this reason, the order matching loop is dynamically limited by the gas supply from msg.gas and will exit with a partially filled order rather than throw it. The remainder does not get put on the book as a make order as it would cause a bid/ask collision at that price. Because of this looping, gas cannot be estimated and it is up to the trader to consider the costs and adjust the amount of gas prior to ordering.
The matching algorithm is not without architectural efficiency however which almost halves the number to calls to STORE by virtualising (caching to memory) the taker's state variables prior to the matching loop and writing back to store once the matching and making operations exit.

Security and Resilience

ITT's hold ether balances and therefore are presumed to be targeted by hacking attempts. A number of security features and practices have therefore been programmed into the contract.
All external or payable state mutating functions are 'reentry protected' by a mutex which is set and cleared in the internal function safeSend(), which is called only by the public function withdraw(). This practice ensures a single entry and exit.
The architecture also separates entry validation logic and parameter preparation which is kept in the external/payable functions, from state mutation logic which is kept in the internal functions. This allows for a secure, flexible, inheritable API/interface layer from which to extend the contract while keeping the basic ITT internal functionality the same.
In the ITT Demo, the default function is unimplemented and therefore throws if payments are sent to anything other than the payable buy() function.
Attention must also be drawn to some rather unconventional use of uint math in the matching loop. Elsewhere, the contract uses explicitly safe maths functions, however the nature of an exchange function requires numerous inverse and signed integer operations. It was found that casting between int and uint became an onerous task with potentially unpredictable outcome and a design decision was made to simply treat uint as signed within the matching loop. In this case -1 == 2**256-1 and is used in multiplication to change the sign of trade amounts during matching.
In light of the signed uint adoption, a further mathematical constraint was placed on the maximum price and amount allowed being 2**128 which prevents any multiplication overflows.

Testing

Given that this contract is Proof of Concept deployment primarily for public review, it should be considered insecure. It has been tested for functionality but no exhaustive testing regime or formal verification has been put against it. It is undeniably a big ugly contract with complex logic and so should be viewed with suspicion.
Interacting with the Live contract is thereby at your own risk!

Self Funding

Being the deploying owner of this Demo ITT, I am granted the full balance of tokens and have placed both ask and bid orders as examples. Purchasing my Ask orders on the Live chain does transfer real ether to my balance and so I am trailing this as a channel for funding my development efforts rather than chasing bounties, competitions, donations, (a real job) or what have you. If you buy tokens here, you could consider it as a much appreciated donation which you might also be able to return a speculative profit from! It would certainly make my life easier. :)

Who Am I?

My name is Darryl Morris AKA o0ragman0o. I'm an independent (and some what isolated) Australian Ethereum developer. Though fairly quite, I've been following Ethereum developments since November 2014 (PoC 6) and have been small time mining since Olympic, though not now with expensive Australian electricity. I am best known on [forum.ethereum.org](forum.ethereum.org) where I am a mod. I've been crypto aware since 2009 when I tried bitcoin in it's infancy. I got 71/70 marks for Griff Green's notorious 'DAO Ninja' homework though obviously needed 72 to recognise the complex of vulnerabilities in that code!
My interests are in developing delegative democracy technologies with which to render all politicians obsolete (particularly ones beginning with 'T'). To that end I've developed the ITT contract as a funding component of a democracy DAO framework I call 'Ethenian DAO'.
Looking for interested collaborators.
Cheers Darryl
submitted by o0ragman0o to ethereum [link] [comments]

Watch out: Frontrunning happening on Cryptopia

Electroneum REALLY needs to get on a few other exchanges. Frontrunning is happening extensively on Cryptopoia.
Trading in small amounts I started to become suspicious because almost nothing was getting filled even right at the sell price. But still, that can happen. So I then put in a 10k trade several Satoshis above the ask and equal to the offer - meaning it should be filled quickly. What happened? A couple hundred filled then I was front-run. That means several thousand orders were placed in front of my order and mine were never filled, AFTER the first few hundred were filled. And the 10k order was in one block!
Ok, so let's test this further. Ran 10 tests of a purchase order of 1k of ETN/BTC, all AT LEAST 5 satoshis above the current offer. This means they really should be filled instantaneously. The result?
Also of interest, the ETN/DOGE market was "temporarily suspended".
So I'm not an expert trader by any means, but I have used at least a dozen web-based exchanges trading crypto, the US market, and some forex. I understand there is an argument to be made about "liquidity" which is complete garbage. This seems quite shady. Maybe someone else can explain this a bit better because I am pissed at the moment.
Edit: spelling, errors
submitted by UnJadedAgain to Electroneum [link] [comments]

For Review: 'Intrinsically Tradable Tokens' (ITT's) are their own exchange

For Review: 'Intrinsically Tradable Tokens' (ITT's) are their own exchange

Introducing Intrinsically Tradable Tokens, ERC20 compliant tokens in which you can buy and sell directly from the contract.
Ropsten 0xa9e001bebe4b281f7229b0305f553ab3c511fef5
Live 0xa15c784319fa96d3E36cFE97fbadD89Ec704A8dc

ITT's extend the ERC20 API with:

buy(uint price, uint amount, bool make) sell(uint price, uint amount, bool make) cancel(uint price) withdraw(uint ether) 
and other ancillary exchange state getters (see Github repo for full API) such as :
etherBalanceOf(address holder) getBook() getOrdersOf(address trader) spread(bool side) 
The intrinsic exchange functionality works on a FIFO matching maketaker algorithm. A new order may be iteratively filled by multiple make orders on the book or if unfilled, can be put on the book itself as a make order.
ITT demo contracts have been deployed on the Ropsten test chain on which a number of Buy and Sell orders have already been placed for you to play with. The demo ITT and future, more functional ITT's can be can be interacted with using the front end DAPP ITTDesk.
This demo ITT serves to demonstrate the exchange functionality of a basic ITT contract and do not have intrinsic value in the token itself beyond being a purely speculative coin.
The ITT API and base contract are open source and offered to the community in order to extend or attach value adding functionality to the token side.
The simplest example of an extended function ITT might be to make a 'Payable ITT' which becomes a simple but highly versatile pay to an unknown many mechanism which can distribute payments according to proportional holdings. Such holdings might represent shareholders, a rewards system or perhaps be used to fund and manage a DAO's project funds. (I do have a Payable ITT but will not likely release it until the community has confidence in the basic ITT contract)
Other value adding developments might be to couple ITT's to fiat currencies for truly low friction decentralised forex.

Current State of Development

As deployed, the ITT Demo contract is yet to undergo extensive testing and formal verification.
The ITTDesk app is still minimalist in it's function though is written on Meteor and attempts to use Mist styling and elements. I am not an experienced web developer, so feed back, suggestions, criticisms are most welcome.

How does it work?

The order book utilises a mapping of 'Circular Linked Lists (CLL)' from the LibCLLi library to order and lookup the booked prices and iterate the FIFO's at each price. Each FIFO in the mapping is keyed by its price and holds all the addresses of traders who have made orders at that price. A trader can only have a single order at any particular price. An attempt to book another order at the same price will adjust and put the order at the back of the FIFO queue. This prevents FIFO hogging in which a trader might otherwise starve other orders by continually topping up their own.
A second trivial mapping holds the actual order amounts. It is keyed by a SHA3 hash of the trader's address with the price of the order (and is actually what limits the trader to one price, one order).
The CLL's heads are static at mapping key '0'. To use as a FIFO, nodes are simply inserted previous to the head and removed from next to the head. A FILO (stack) can be implemented with equal simplicity.
In the case of the price list, the links either side of the head are the highestBid (previous) and lowestAsk (next) making the head node itself the market spread. The price list is artificially bound to minimum (uint 1) and maximum (uint 2**128) prices. New price nodes are inserted relative to the head (spread) after iterating through an order search.
Looping operations in Smart Contracts can be bug prone and costly, especially with state mutations in each loop as in the ITT's matching algorithm. For this reason, the order matching loop is dynamically limited by the gas supply from msg.gas and will exit with a partially filled order rather than throw it. The remainder does not get put on the book as a make order as it would cause a bid/ask collision at that price. Because of this looping, gas cannot be estimated and it is up to the trader to consider the costs and adjust the amount of gas prior to ordering.
The matching algorithm is not without architectural efficiency however which almost halves the number to calls to STORE by virtualising (caching to memory) the taker's state variables prior to the matching loop and writing back to store once the matching and making operations exit.

Security and Resilience

ITT's hold ether balances and therefore are presumed to be targeted by hacking attempts. A number of security features and practices have therefore been programmed into the contract.
All external or payable state mutating functions are 'reentry protected' by a mutex which is set and cleared in the internal function safeSend(), which is called only by the public function withdraw(). This practice ensures a single entry and exit.
The architecture also separates entry validation logic and parameter preparation which is kept in the external/payable functions, from state mutation logic which is kept in the internal functions. This allows for a secure, flexible, inheritable API/interface layer from which to extend the contract while keeping the basic ITT internal functionality the same.
In the ITT Demo, the default function is unimplemented and therefore throws if payments are sent to anything other than the payable buy() function.
Attention must also be drawn to some rather unconventional use of uint math in the matching loop. Elsewhere, the contract uses explicitly safe maths functions, however the nature of an exchange function requires numerous inverse and signed integer operations. It was found that casting between int and uint became an onerous task with potentially unpredictable outcome and a design decision was made to simply treat uint as signed within the matching loop. In this case -1 == 2**256-1 and is used in multiplication to change the sign of trade amounts during matching.
In light of the signed uint adoption, a further mathematical constraint was placed on the maximum price and amount allowed being 2**128 which prevents any multiplication overflows.

Testing

Given that this contract is deployed primarily for public review, it should be considered insecure. It has been tested for functionality but no exhaustive testing regime or formal verification has been put against it. It is undeniably a big ugly contract with complex logic and so should be viewed with suspicion.
Interacting with the Live contract is thereby at your own risk!

Self Funding

Being the deploying owner of this Demo ITT, I am granted the full balance of tokens and have placed both ask and bid orders as examples. Purchasing my Ask order on the Live chain does transfer real ether to my balance and so I am trailing this as a channel for funding my development efforts rather than chasing bounties, competitions, donations, (a real job) or what have you. If you buy tokens here, you could consider it as a donation which you might also be able to return a speculative profit from! It would certainly make my life easier. :)

Who Am I?

My name is Darryl Morris AKA o0ragman0o. I'm an independent (and some what isolated) Australian Ethereum developer. Though fairly quite, I've been following Ethereum developments since November 2014 (PoC 6) and have been small time mining since Olympic, though not now with expensive Australian electricity. I am best known on [forum.ethereum.org](forum.ethereum.org) where I am a mod. I've been crypto aware since 2009 when I tried bitcoin in it's infancy. I got 71/70 marks for Griff Green's notorious 'DAO Ninja' homework though obviously needed 72 to recognise the complex of vulnerabilities in that code!
My interests are in developing delegative democracy technologies with which to render all politicians obsolete (particularly ones beginning with 'T'). To that end I've developed the ITT contract as a funding component of a democracy DAO framework I call 'Ethenian DAO'.
Looking for interested collaborators.
submitted by o0ragman0o to ethtrader [link] [comments]

have you heard of "online trading acadamy"

Hi I was at an Online Trading Academy seminar and they wanted me to sign up for a 3-day trading seminar for 150. They do technical analyses with unfilled orders. (what is that). I heard their classes are 10-20K. Basically they have a way of telling with a 70% chance that the price of trade will return to a set price and based on that they position an entry and exit.
I want to do Forex trading because apparently it has a 50:1 leverage.
submitted by rr2999 to Forex [link] [comments]

How Long To Hold Open Limit Orders (4H/DAILY)

**** NOTE TO FUTURE SELF - THIS IS MY VERY FIRST POST IN FOREX AND THE START OF MY TRADING CAREER ***
  1. When placing a reversal trade on a 4H chart with a limit order, how long do you typically let the order stay unfilled before it is canceled? Is it the same for an order against the daily charts? Do you base your cancel deadline on end of day? For example, is placing a limit order on a 4H chart that stays open and unfulfilled for 8H good or bad?
  2. Also, when setting a stop loss or take profit order, do you always let it ride until that point? Or do you also put in a stop for a specific time of the day? EG, you put in an order at 1400, with a TP of 1500; do you close out order at 1473 if it is 4P EST (or any market close time)? Or do you let it ride longer to reach that 1500 mark?
submitted by ffoorreexx to Forex [link] [comments]

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